Bridges: Our Stories for Early Readers

“Many of our students have had to leave their extended family behind in their native countries. As they worked on shared, hands-on projects, the senior volunteers told stories and listened to students’ stories and provided the gift of loving friendship and acceptance that grandparents and special elders offer in a child’s life.”

Bridges: Our Stories at Central Michigan University

In Bridges: Our Stories, picture books provide the theme for each session. Components of each session typically include:

  • a movement activity;
  • interactive book discussion;
  • sharing family stories; and
  • a related art project.

Participants will:

  • experience how a book can ‘come to life’;
  • learn about their family histories; and
  • enjoy ‘classic’ activities such as making newspaper hats and playing musical chairs.

Learning and building together during Bridges: Our Stories

Specific books, along with their themes, include:

  • The Story of Ferdinand (by Munro Leaf, Drawings by Robert Lawson) with the theme of each person is special;
  • Mike Mulligan and the Steam Shovel (by Virginia Lee Burton) with the theme that each of us works hard to accomplish a goal;
  • Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day (by Judith Viorst) with the theme that sometimes we experience difficult days but we also have wonderful days;
  • A Chair for My Mother (by Vera B. Williams) with the theme of saving money and also there are always ‘helpers’ should a crisis occur;
  • Miss Rumphius (by Barbara Cooney) with the theme that each of us can make the world a more beautiful place;
  • A Wonderful World (by George David Weiss and Bob Thiele, Illustrated by Ashley Bryan) with the theme of identifying the wonderful things in our world;
  • The Family Tree (by David McPhail) with the theme of exploring our family trees and favorite trees.

For more information, contact us our Intergenerational Facilitator Julie Shaw via email or at 978.793.9509.

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