Easy-to-implement ideas for intergenerational programs

Training group shot At the Last Lunch, Learn and Network, attendees shared these easy to implement ideas from their own programs.  Which might work for you?

  •        Have people create nametags that say “My name is ______.  Ask me about ________.”
  •        Put conversation starters, either questions or pictures, on tables where people gather.
  •        Fun activity:  Do mirror shadows – where old and young mirror each other’s actions.
  •        Play music and dance with scarves.
  •        Do a service project for an outside community group – like baking dog biscuits for an animal shelter, or putting together a party pack for Birthday Wishes, an organization that brings birthday parties to homeless children.
  •        When looking for volunteers, think about what roles you have to fill and then look for appropriate people. For example, at the Latke-palooza, Aviv needs fun activities for guests to engage in. Teens need community service and have lots of energy/ideas. Invite teens to lead activities such as doing manicures or facepainting.
  •        When looking to initiate a new program, think about what groups of people you have readily available and what their interest is, then look for a partner organization.  Lynda shared that at one of the HSL communities, there were many Holocaust survivors who wanted to share their stories. So she reached out to a local school and asked if they had an opportunity for these people to come and share.
  •        Bring in a multigenerational artists, musicians, storytellers.
  •        Have people share collections – perhaps even create a “museum” of collections.
  •        Build community. Invite outside (music or other such) groups in to practice or hold meetings in your space.
  •        Remember:  It is important to ensure safety – physical and emotional.

Resources

 

If You're an Educator...


If You Work with Older Adults...


If You're a Parent...